Welcome?

If you have found this blog, saying Welcome does not really seem appropriate. I know you wish you weren't surfing the internet for diabetes. I felt the same.

A big part of me wishes I were not writing about diabetes, nor did I anticipate to become so opinionated or informed on the subject, but it happened. In 2010, my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.

It wasn't really part of the plan… Correction - it was not part of the plan, but it happened. It is not always easy, but I think we are all doing okay, and I hope we continue to do so.

Why the Middle East? I happen to live in Dubai. I don't think that living in the Middle East makes mine or my son's diabetic experience any more unique or challenging than it does elsewhere in the developed world.

I hope you stick around, or read something you like. Feel free to comment and join the conversation, subscribe or follow this blog by liking the Facebook page Diapoint.

Please note: This blog does not give medical advice. I am opinionated, and I share my experiences, but the first rule of diabetes is to follow up with your doctor and/or nurse educator about your care, diagnosis or medication. If you do not have a medical practitioner that is helping you find your way through this crazy world, then do not give up until you find the right one.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Man In The Mirror

As 2016 ends, I struggle to find something significant to write or say that reflects on this year. I have nothing of diabetic significance to say that hasn't already been said. Maybe I will over the next week, but as I think of my sign off blog post for 2016, I am at a loss.

The world seems to be a mess for many reasons.. racism, war, terror and other atrocities we read about daily. At least my son is still young enough to live in a bubble. Although that bubble is slowly getting poked at.

Just last week he was curious about 9/11 after a discussion in school about Phillippe Pettit who walked across a tight rope between the two towers in 1974. Some children were aware that those towers no longer exist, but were not completely sure as to why. Of course I "mommed up" and told him the full story.

Today I took the day off and we went to visit the Legoland that recently opened in Dubai. On the drive home, I put on my favorite playlist in Spotify that I fondly call "Peanut Butter & the JAM". Full of songs I love, it is definitely my most played - and keeps growing.

Michael Jackson's "Man In the Mirror" came on. My son asked if we could listen to it again. He is very much my child - listening to a song again and again until he understands all the lyrics.

I asked him if he understood the message in the song. He did.

He replied, "If you want to make the world a better place, you should change yourself".

After a few seconds of contemplation - as he often does - he says, "You know mom, sometimes you can just change the world with your smile. Your smile can change people."

And you know what. He is right.

Everyone wants a change. Sometimes it is hard to decide what to change, or where that change should start. Sometimes it feels bigger than us. And while sometimes it is bigger than us, and we can't move a mountain right away, maybe a smile is a start.

In many cases, a little kindness can go a long way.

In the context of diabetes.. I can't add much today.. Maybe it is a cure you want, or people to better understand your challenges, or you just want to understand why your blood sugars act up... whatever the case may be.. maybe he is right. Start with a smile. Whether that is to others, or showing yourself some compassion, a little can go a long way.

Monday, December 5, 2016

News or False

I subscribe to various news alerts for diabetes. There is so much happening in the world of medical research and technology that it would be impossible to keep up with it all from one source.

How else could I have learned this week about the potential of the malaria vaccine to help Type1s produce insulin, or a new joint venture that will bring an implantable Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) to market. Many exciting things are happening every day.

While I cannot read every single newsflash, for the articles I can read, I have a mental categorization: News, Not Quite Newsworthy, and False.

This week an article from a newspaper in a not so far away continent came buried in my string of news emails.  The title started “How I Naturally Cured Diabetes….”

I have written before that the natural cure promise is not always possible, and in some cases it is impossible. I am a strong advocate of complimentary medicine - complimentary in the sense it should compliment what has been prescribed by your endocrinologist or someone else on your medically certified diabetic team.

I typically ignore these types of claims now as there are too many to count. But this one I have to highlight because I do believe the confident tone of articles like these misleads a lot of people, and could result in the harm of unsuspecting diabetics, or those new to this crazy world of managing diabetes.

This article addressed the “most frequently asked questions”. Question number 2 was “There can’t be a cure for Type 1 when your pancreas is damaged, how are you going to make a new pancreas?” Which is a legitimate question to someone that offers you a miracle cure.

The answer. “Its only an organ and every organ of the body has the capability of regeneration”

ONLY an organ? ONLY? There is so much wrong with this statement. But I think my son has lived with diabetes long enough and I have worked around physicians long enough that I can openly say, your organs and body parts are NOT JUST ORGANS. They are incredible parts of you that give you life, breath, energy, vision and all of those amazing things that allow us to live the lives we do. Forget the very important overlooked detail that beta cells kill any regeneration of cells in the pancreas of a Type 1, and will continue to do so until a medical cure for this autoimmune issue is found.

The next question goes on to ask, “Then why do doctors not tell their patients?”

The answer “Its because they will lose their license if they do not promote harmful and toxic drugs from large pharma companies”

While it is true doctors would fear to loose their licenses if they told their patients to stop their medication because a regimen of only cinnamon and ginseng would cure them, it is not for the reason cited here. The "cure" promised here is false.

I will keep this short and brief, but please be aware. No matter what part of the world you are in, there is no cure for diabetes. Type1s are insulin dependent. They cannot live without insulin.

Type2s may need insulin, but they can often manage blood sugars with diet and exercise as prescribed by a doctor or nutritionist.

Please do not take my word for it. Ask your medical doctor first.

If there were a natural way to cure this thing, be sure, the more than half a million children counted by the IDF with Type 1 diabetes would have been cured by now.

Cinnamon and ginseng over insulin.... file under FALSE